The Enmeshed



10 January 2019 - 31 January 2019
A+ Works of Art

A+ Works of Art is proud to present The Enmeshed, a group exhibition showcasing five Thai artists, Marnee Maelae, Samak Kosem, Anuwat Apimukmongkon, Ahama Sa-I and Amru Thaisnit, curated by Penwadee Nophaket Manont. 


Through photography, installation and video, The Enmeshed portrays a diversity of personal perspectives from artists living in the Deep South of Thailand — Pattani, Yala and Narathiwas — three places that have been stereotyped by the violence and unrest that has plagued the area and its people. 


While images of bombings and criminal activity around the border between Thailand and Malaysia may be the staple of mainstream media coverage, these images barely offer a glimpse into the everyday lives of the region’s inhabitants.


An anthropologist, Samak Kosem, in his short documentary film, attempts to depict the experience of alienation and exclusion felt by the minority community of Muslim Thais. His film juxtaposes narratives from the Deep South with those from the rest of Thailand, by examining the journey of sheep fated for sacrifice. While the killing of animals for food is common throughout the whole country, Samak’s film reveals how the Islamic ritual slaughter of sheep has been stigmatised.


Anuwat Apimukmongkon captures images of the daily life of his friend Banglee. Openly bisexual, Banglee is often cast as an “other” in Thai society. Anuwat’s photographs are overlaid with lyrics of propagandistic songs, familiar tunes that exude nationalist pride and call for a sense of unity. Through these images, the artists explores the tensions between nationalism and the nation’s ability or inability to accept the other.


Amru Thaisnit draws from personal experience to create an installation based on the passing of his own relatives and friends because of the civil unrest in the region. Digging shallow graves in the shapes of bullets, Thaisnit provokes the viewer to go beyond reacting abstractly to the images of more violence, inviting us to contemplate the deaths of real individuals from Nathariwat on a visceral level. 


In a more hopeful light, artists Marnee Maelae and Ahama Sa-l use their respective practices to explore themes beyond the strife and tragedy. Ahama, through the traditional practice of batik, which is common throughout the southernmost parts of Thailand, creates pieces which make the case for the concept of beauty as being central to the universe. Marnee’s fabrics drape languidly across the gallery, and are supported by Arabic text that scrolls along the perpendicular walls; the pairing suggest waves that are symbolic of time and change, and how prayer in Islam expresses time and change.

The Enmeshed

The Enmeshed
Curator: Penwadee Nophaket Manont
Co-curators: Soifa Saenkhamkon, Supphakarn Wongkaew
Period: 10 – 31 January 2019 
Artists: Ahama Sa-i, Amru Thaisnit, Anuwat Apimukmongkon, Marnee Maelae, Samak Kosem,
Venue: A+ WORKS of ART, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Originally supported and organized by: The Art Centre Silpakorn University, Bangkok, Thailand 
Curated by: Rai.D Collective

In Thailand, the aftermath of social exclusion and alienation can be conveyed through diverse episodes and dimensions of conflict. One of the most obvious reflections—but often overlooked, is the source of  the problem and yet it still unexpectedly erodes and tests the mentality and humanity of Thai people in general—is the insurgency in Pattani, Yala and Narathiwas, the three southernmost provinces of Thailand, that have withstood decades of gun and bomb attacks. The causes have been diagnosed as a result of  separatist issues, criminal gangs and illegal activities near the Thai border, shared with Malaysia. Both civilians and security forces have been injured and killed, while many people have lost their property and loved ones in the midst of the violence. Besides this, the noteworthiness of these incidents seem to have distinctive links to the overall political crisis in Thailand as well.

But under this specific situation, how does this reflection erode and test the mentality and humanity of both the locals, as well as people residing outside the area? Because of the ongoing unrest, Muslim-Thais have been inevitably labeled as “separatists”, causing a growing gap of alienation amongst Thai people as a whole. The Deep South has gradually turned into and labeled as a ‘dangerous and forbidden’ area, where most Thais do not feel safe to visit. Hence, leading to the intriguing question of how the people inhabiting such an unconventional environment cope with and maintain their normal ways of living and thinking, as they face fear and paranoia in everyday life simultaneously. Some are confronted by the anxiety of how others perceive them and their hometown, in terms of “the land of ​​violence”, and also the feeling of being excluded under inescapable conditions.

People in central Bangkok and other areas across the country, almost never have the opportunity to become acquainted with, get access to nor perceive the development of contemporary art in the Deep South, within the specific context of the southernmost provinces nearing the border. The works of art created by those of the Deep South not only serve aesthetic expressions of their beliefs, ways of life and endemic culture, but also act as tools to record their anecdotes, both on individual and social levels. Thinking about the contemporary is a response to addressing their existence, along with their conscious, subconscious and unconscious mind and how that has been affected by ongoing disturbance, fright and paranoia.



The Enmeshed presents a selection of works that reflect upon a the current states of people in the southernmost region—where you will find that these experiences are usually conveyed through images of violence and unrest. The exhibition invites the audience to connect with their actual lifestyle and  which is normally difficult to access or understand through other types of media. These perspectives are presented through anthropologists, artists, cultural workers, local people and other socio-political activist groups. By sharing records of their story and the realities of their society—that seems to have been, for a long time, deliberately enmeshed with conflict and unease in everyday life. This contemporary record can also serve as a reflection of dispute in other societies around us, which are unavoidably corroding our mentality and humanity at last. 

Therefore, this exhibition is not only aimed at providing viewers with the access to and gain better understanding of how people in the Deep South are living, but we also expect the audience to be able to reconsider and realize the conflict and violence happening around us—at local, social and national levels— that we may neglect the genuine source of the issue, dreaded only by fear and hatred. Each dispute is often deliberately created by authorities or rulers, with the aim to cause turbulence, disaffection and discord among us — the commoners. Consequently, it can cause us mental and ideological weakness, as well as loss of social conscience, until we are easily manipulated to follow the direction of their distorted social values, at last.

The Enmeshed

10 January 2019 - 31 January 2019
A+ Works of Art

A+ Works of Art is proud to present The Enmeshed, a group exhibition showcasing five Thai artists, Marnee Maelae, Samak Kosem, Anuwat Apimukmongkon, Ahama Sa-I and Amru Thaisnit, curated by Penwadee Nophaket Manont. 


Through photography, installation and video, The Enmeshed portrays a diversity of personal perspectives from artists living in the Deep South of Thailand — Pattani, Yala and Narathiwas — three places that have been stereotyped by the violence and unrest that has plagued the area and its people. 


While images of bombings and criminal activity around the border between Thailand and Malaysia may be the staple of mainstream media coverage, these images barely offer a glimpse into the everyday lives of the region’s inhabitants.


An anthropologist, Samak Kosem, in his short documentary film, attempts to depict the experience of alienation and exclusion felt by the minority community of Muslim Thais. His film juxtaposes narratives from the Deep South with those from the rest of Thailand, by examining the journey of sheep fated for sacrifice. While the killing of animals for food is common throughout the whole country, Samak’s film reveals how the Islamic ritual slaughter of sheep has been stigmatised.


Anuwat Apimukmongkon captures images of the daily life of his friend Banglee. Openly bisexual, Banglee is often cast as an “other” in Thai society. Anuwat’s photographs are overlaid with lyrics of propagandistic songs, familiar tunes that exude nationalist pride and call for a sense of unity. Through these images, the artists explores the tensions between nationalism and the nation’s ability or inability to accept the other.


Amru Thaisnit draws from personal experience to create an installation based on the passing of his own relatives and friends because of the civil unrest in the region. Digging shallow graves in the shapes of bullets, Thaisnit provokes the viewer to go beyond reacting abstractly to the images of more violence, inviting us to contemplate the deaths of real individuals from Nathariwat on a visceral level. 


In a more hopeful light, artists Marnee Maelae and Ahama Sa-l use their respective practices to explore themes beyond the strife and tragedy. Ahama, through the traditional practice of batik, which is common throughout the southernmost parts of Thailand, creates pieces which make the case for the concept of beauty as being central to the universe. Marnee’s fabrics drape languidly across the gallery, and are supported by Arabic text that scrolls along the perpendicular walls; the pairing suggest waves that are symbolic of time and change, and how prayer in Islam expresses time and change.

The Enmeshed