Transience and Transformation



06 September 2019 - 28 September 2019
A+ Works of Art

A+ Works of Art is proud to present Transience and Transformation, a group exhibition showcasing works by artists Imhathai Suwatthanasilp, Jiratchaya Pripwai and Yim Yen Sum.


Transience — a state of ephemerality, an experience that exists only for a fleeting moment — is a phenomenon that has never been more pronounced than in our present day of technological saturation. Flittering widgets of information aim to feed our continually withering attention-spans. It seems we are always helplessly interrupted by the next smartphone notification. The paradox is that we make a fetish of time as we waste so much of it, trying to make the most efficient, most valuable decision possible in an instant.


The exhibition, Transience and Transformation, alludes to that juncture of reflection that lingers and stretches out our sense of time, offering us a brief respite from the frenzy of our time. The artworks on show at the gallery exemplify the slow process of change and capture the effects of passing time on our society, embedded in the forms of materials and processes. Muted in their palettes and subtle in their details, the works channel minimalism and are evocative through their quiet sensibilities; they emphasise the emotions inherent in constant change and contain within them a tension that becomes obvious upon closer inspection of their materiality. 


Imhathai Suwatthanasilp’s works refer to nature, taking on amorphous forms which are reflected in the lines that swoop across and loop on their surfaces. The lines themselves add depth and life to their overall shapes. Much of her practice has an emphasis on materials, which is evident throughout the progression of abstraction in the series of works on display. One of the more unconventional materials that Imhathai uses is hair: we often associate it with our sense of identity and it is one of the major physical attributes that define a person’s appearance. In this case though, hair is used as a representation of the passing of time, revealing the stories of the lives of the ones that it was once attached to. In addition to her drawings, Imhathai’s use of hair appears again in the sculptural objects she has created. The objects resemble offerings that, like the flowers her mother used to collect as offerings to Buddhist altars, represent the daily rituals that bind faith and love, and act as moments of introspection, and bids for happiness.


Jiratchaya Pripwai’s works resonate with a theme of catharsis; her series of drawings highlight the practice as a means for therapy, with every line drawn in a continuous action across the paper. Long and ceaseless in their strokes, the marks resemble fabric-like textures with wrinkles and folds that distort the paper’s two-dimensional surface into one that protrudes outward. By controlling the line quality and density, Jiratchaya sets her graphic textures in motion, like sheets billowing in a breeze. The imagery itself is captivating. Every stroke, line and application of paint is intuitively done with a sensitivity to her own present emotional state, resulting in her pieces becoming recordings her subconscious. Each piece consists of extensive meditation, one that she spends hours immersing herself in to create the abstract monochromatic imagery.


Yim Yen Sum’s work sews together the past and present, in an attempt to record recollections of her memories as a child growing up in Malaysia’s fast-changing urban environment. Yen Sum uses a layering of different methods to further the appearance of abstraction in her works. This reflecting the nature of memory itself, and the way in which different memories layer each other to eventually inform the way we experience and react to the world. By layering embroidery and appliqué upon silk-screen prints and manipulating fabrics, like gauze, the results are an accumulation of sculptural works that often times get assembled together into larger-scaled installations. Drawing inspiration from her surroundings, Yen Sum captures aspects of dilapidating buildings around Kuala Lumpur, in an attempt to document their neglect and decay throughout the years, in contrast to the new and ongoing developments spreading throughout the city. Her works address the conflict between the ideals of tradition and innovation, as well as comment on the struggle to find a balance between the two.


Transience and Transformation

Find Rest



by Lienne Loy

Transience — a state of ephemerality, an experience that exists only for a fleeting moment — is a phenomenon that has never been more pronounced than in our present day of technological saturation. Flittering widgets of information aim to feed our continually withering attention-spans. It seems we are always helplessly interrupted by the next smartphone notification. The paradox is that we make a fetish of time as we waste so much of it, trying to make the most efficient, most valuable decision possible in an instant. 

The exhibition, Transience and Transformation, alludes to that juncture of reflection that lingers and stretches out our sense of time, offering us a brief respite from the frenzy of our time. The artworks on show at the gallery exemplify the slow process of change and capture the effects of passing time on our society, embedded in the forms of materials and processes. Muted in their palettes and subtle in their details, the works channel minimalism and are evocative through their quiet sensibilities; they emphasise the emotions inherent in constant change and contain within them a tension that becomes obvious upon closer inspection of their materiality. 

Imhathai Suwatthanasilp’s works refer to nature, taking on amorphous forms which are reflected in the lines that swoop across and loop on their surfaces. The lines themselves add depth and life to their overall shapes. Much of her practice has an emphasis on materials, which is evident throughout the progression of abstraction in the series of works on display. One of the more unconventional materials that Imhathai uses is hair: we often associate it with our sense of identity and it is one of the major physical attributes that define a person’s appearance. In this case though, hair is used as a representation of the passing of time, revealing the stories of the lives of the ones that it was once attached to. The long hairs that are matted on her drawings bring to mind women within Thai society, whose positions are oftentimes determined by sociopolitical factors such as the underrepresentation of women and their concerns in the workplace, and the relegation of women to the role of homemaker.

In addition to her drawings, Imhathai’s use of hair appears again in the sculptural objects she has created. In her practice she transforms strands of fallen hair into meticulously crocheted nets, which stretch around to consume dried flowers. The objects resemble offerings that, like the flowers her mother used to collect as offerings to Buddhist altars, represent the daily rituals that bind faith and love, and act as moments of introspection, and bids for happiness. Her works also often comments subtly on issues of women and their perceived roles in society, of which her employment of crochet exemplifies. A practice that evokes domesticity, the artist has subverted that presumption in the ways she has taken ownership of it. 

Jiratchaya Pripwai’s works resonate with a theme of catharsis; her series of drawings highlight the practice as a means for therapy, with every line drawn in a continuous action across the paper. Long and ceaseless in their strokes, the marks resemble fabric-like textures with wrinkles and folds that distort the paper’s two-dimensional surface into one that protrudes outward. By controlling the line quality and density, Jiratchaya sets her graphic textures in motion, like sheets billowing in a breeze. The imagery itself is captivating. Every stroke, line and application of paint is intuitively done with a sensitivity to her own present emotional state, resulting in her pieces becoming recordings her subconscious. Each piece consists of extensive meditation, one that she spends hours immersing herself in to create the abstract monochromatic imagery.

Yim Yen Sum’s work sews together the past and present, in an attempt to record recollections of her memories as a child growing up in Malaysia’s fast-changing urban environment. Yen Sum uses a layering of different methods to further the appearance of abstraction in her works. This reflecting the nature of memory itself, and the way in which different memories layer each other to eventually inform the way we experience and react to the world. By layering embroidery and appliqué upon silk-screen prints and manipulating fabrics, like gauze, the results are an accumulation of sculptural works that often times get assembled together into larger-scaled installations. Drawing inspiration from her surroundings, Yen Sum captures aspects of dilapidating buildings around Kuala Lumpur, in an attempt to document their neglect and decay throughout the years, in contrast to the new and ongoing developments spreading throughout the city. Her works address the conflict between the ideals of tradition and innovation, as well as comment on the struggle to find a balance between the two.

The acclaimed artist Agnes Martin, known for her minimalist works which explore the aesthetic encounter and its relationship to enlightenment, published a collection of her thoughts in 1972, The Untroubled Mind. As a number of Martin’s ideas resonate with certain themes in Transience and Transformation, it might be useful to detour through Martin as a way of attaining another perspective on the exhibition. Martin writes about how adults are often “so startled by inspiration”, as if it were a rare experience, but she argues that it “is there all the time”; the wonder that we attribute to children is not something lost or irretrievable for grown-ups. In Yen Sum’s work, in spite of the melancholic tone, there is also this call to reconnect with our sense of child-like curiosity. 

For Martin, the act of reducing down the visual elements in her works to suggestions and allusions created a space for contemplation, a process that Martin refers to as “rest” in her writing. She writes about how a painting can help one find a place of rest — a temporary state of relief from the chaos of modern life. Martin noted that “People get what they need from a painting”, further emphasising the power of giving inherent to art. 
This sense of pause can be found throughout Jiratchaya’s works: the way in which her lines seem to undulate outward of their constraints to allow the observer space to contemplate each line more carefully, to follow each one as they coincide and crossover the other, repeating endlessly. And in Imhathai’s work, where the act of collecting hair, in turn identities and histories, reflects on the meditative aspect of re-membering knowledge. 

Transience, a state of perpetual shifting, and Transformation, the process of change from one thing to another, are two delicate moments of unease that have the potential to lead to an awakening of peace and purpose in life. As Martin wrote:

“Of course we know that an untroubled state of mind 
cannot last so we say that inspiration comes and goes 
but really it is there all the time waiting for us to be untroubled again.”

Transience and Transformation

06 September 2019 - 28 September 2019
A+ Works of Art

A+ Works of Art is proud to present Transience and Transformation, a group exhibition showcasing works by artists Imhathai Suwatthanasilp, Jiratchaya Pripwai and Yim Yen Sum.


Transience — a state of ephemerality, an experience that exists only for a fleeting moment — is a phenomenon that has never been more pronounced than in our present day of technological saturation. Flittering widgets of information aim to feed our continually withering attention-spans. It seems we are always helplessly interrupted by the next smartphone notification. The paradox is that we make a fetish of time as we waste so much of it, trying to make the most efficient, most valuable decision possible in an instant.


The exhibition, Transience and Transformation, alludes to that juncture of reflection that lingers and stretches out our sense of time, offering us a brief respite from the frenzy of our time. The artworks on show at the gallery exemplify the slow process of change and capture the effects of passing time on our society, embedded in the forms of materials and processes. Muted in their palettes and subtle in their details, the works channel minimalism and are evocative through their quiet sensibilities; they emphasise the emotions inherent in constant change and contain within them a tension that becomes obvious upon closer inspection of their materiality. 


Imhathai Suwatthanasilp’s works refer to nature, taking on amorphous forms which are reflected in the lines that swoop across and loop on their surfaces. The lines themselves add depth and life to their overall shapes. Much of her practice has an emphasis on materials, which is evident throughout the progression of abstraction in the series of works on display. One of the more unconventional materials that Imhathai uses is hair: we often associate it with our sense of identity and it is one of the major physical attributes that define a person’s appearance. In this case though, hair is used as a representation of the passing of time, revealing the stories of the lives of the ones that it was once attached to. In addition to her drawings, Imhathai’s use of hair appears again in the sculptural objects she has created. The objects resemble offerings that, like the flowers her mother used to collect as offerings to Buddhist altars, represent the daily rituals that bind faith and love, and act as moments of introspection, and bids for happiness.


Jiratchaya Pripwai’s works resonate with a theme of catharsis; her series of drawings highlight the practice as a means for therapy, with every line drawn in a continuous action across the paper. Long and ceaseless in their strokes, the marks resemble fabric-like textures with wrinkles and folds that distort the paper’s two-dimensional surface into one that protrudes outward. By controlling the line quality and density, Jiratchaya sets her graphic textures in motion, like sheets billowing in a breeze. The imagery itself is captivating. Every stroke, line and application of paint is intuitively done with a sensitivity to her own present emotional state, resulting in her pieces becoming recordings her subconscious. Each piece consists of extensive meditation, one that she spends hours immersing herself in to create the abstract monochromatic imagery.


Yim Yen Sum’s work sews together the past and present, in an attempt to record recollections of her memories as a child growing up in Malaysia’s fast-changing urban environment. Yen Sum uses a layering of different methods to further the appearance of abstraction in her works. This reflecting the nature of memory itself, and the way in which different memories layer each other to eventually inform the way we experience and react to the world. By layering embroidery and appliqué upon silk-screen prints and manipulating fabrics, like gauze, the results are an accumulation of sculptural works that often times get assembled together into larger-scaled installations. Drawing inspiration from her surroundings, Yen Sum captures aspects of dilapidating buildings around Kuala Lumpur, in an attempt to document their neglect and decay throughout the years, in contrast to the new and ongoing developments spreading throughout the city. Her works address the conflict between the ideals of tradition and innovation, as well as comment on the struggle to find a balance between the two.


Transience and Transformation